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HEALTH E-SERVICE PLATFORM

Health eServices is composed of industry-based health information technology practitioners and noted academic researchers. We are highly experienced in health IT, data exchange standards, compliance assessment, and testing.

We seek to help entities resolve challenging technologies, policies, and regulatory issues involved with effective sharing of client health information. We seek to provide comprehensive guidance on data standards, regulatory requirements, and sustainable technology practices.

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Recent Health IT Articles Posted By Health eServices

FDA Warns People with Diabetes and Health Care Providers Against the Use of Devices for Diabetes Management Not Authorized for Sale in the United States

An FDA Safety Communication

Nathan Botts 0 213 Article rating: No rating

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is warning health care providers and people with diabetes of risks associated with use of devices for diabetes management unauthorized for sale in the U.S., whether used alone or along with other devices. These unauthorized diabetes management devices have not been reviewed by the FDA to ensure they provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness for their intended use. Use of unauthorized devices could result in inaccurate glucose level readings or unsafe insulin dosing, which can lead to injury requiring medical intervention or death.

Have you considered your privacy rights when using birth control apps?

Assessment of a Wired.com article by Megan Molteni

Nathan Botts 0 1362 Article rating: 5.0

Abstract from the article titled, "Before Using Birth Control Apps Consider Your Privacy" posted on Wired.com: "Natural Cycles’ privacy policy states that in using the app each user grants the company and any of its partners broad rights to “use, reproduce, distribute, modify, adapt, prepare derivative works of, publicly display, publicly perform, communicate to the public, and otherwise utilize and exploit a user's anonymized information.”

OCR Guidance on Ensuring Equal Access to Emergency Services During Hurricane Florence

Official guidance from the Office for Civil Rights

Nathan Botts 0 2573 Article rating: 5.0

As Hurricane Florence makes landfall, the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) and its federal partners remain in close coordination to help ensure that emergency officials effectively address the needs of at-risk populations as part of disaster response. If you believe that a person or organization covered by the Privacy and Security Rules (a "covered entity") violated your health information privacy rights or otherwise violated the Privacy or Security Rules, you may file a complaint with OCR. For additional information about how to file a complaint, visit OCR's web page on filing complaints at http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/complaints/index.html.

Get it. Check it. Use it.

Guidance from the Office for Civil Rights on your right to access your health records

Nathan Botts 0 2940 Article rating: 5.0

From the HHS Office for Civil Rights website: Ask your doctor. You have the right to see and get copies of your health information - PDF. In most cases, you can get a copy the way you want it, such as by e-mail. While your doctor normally has up to 30 days to provide you a copy of your information, your doctor often can provide the information much sooner than that. If your doctor offers a web portal, you may be able to easily view and download your health information whenever you want.

What you should know when submitting your DNA to genetic testing labs

With a April 2019 update from a Wired article

Nathan Botts 1 2275 Article rating: 5.0

Subjective: An abstract from the McClatchy article: "In the age of Facebook and Google, consumers seem comfortable surrendering their personal information to corporations that aggregate it and monetize it. But Ancestry and other DNA testing companies have added an audacious tweak: Consumers are now paying to hand over their genetic code, their most sensitive individual identifier, to companies that could monetize it far into the future.‚Äč"

Why are wearables not better targeted toward the people who might need them the most?

Analysis of the J.C. Herz article at Wired.com

Nathan Botts 0 2969 Article rating: 5.0

SUBJECTIVE: Abstract from the article titled, "Wearable Are Totally Failing The People Who Need Them Most" posted on Wired Magazine: "As the Internet of Things becomes an actual thing, more steps are being counted, more sleep patterns are being logged, more activities are being appified. What isn’t appearing in the data is much common sense or ambition. Instead, developers continue flocking to a saturated market filled with hipster pet rocks, devices that gather reams of largely superficial information for young people whose health isn’t in question, or at risk."

How to Navigate Health App Permissions

An assessment of the article from Wired magazine

Nathan Botts 0 3789 Article rating: 5.0

SUBJECTIVE: This article published in Wired magazine discusses the long tail of privacy considerations that we need to think through when installing and giving permissions to apps on our smartphones, computers, and other internet connected devices. It brings to light the many different ways in which seemingly innocent functionalities that you turn on in apps can gather a lot of information that is often unknown to the user.

How do you control where your DNA data resides and how it is shared online?

An assessment of the article from Bloomberg

Nathan Botts 0 3481 Article rating: 5.0

Abstract from the Bllomberg article: "Your genetic code includes details about not only your own health and family, but also similarly intimate information about your relatives. When police recently used a genetic genealogy website to find a suspect in the case of the Golden State Killer, it illuminated the unexpected ways that your genetic data can be used by people you had no idea you were sharing it with."

Is It Legal to Record Your Visit with the Doctor?

Journal of the American Medical Association with an updated article from the BMJ

Nathan Botts 0 6613 Article rating: 4.7

In the article titled, "Can Patients Make Recordings of Medical Encounters?" from the JAMA Network authors Elwyn, Barr, and Castaldo discuss some of the broader legalities of making a recording while visiting your doctor.

Making a recording that you can add to your personal health record can be a great way of maintaining documentation and accountability for your care, as well as assist you and your family in remembering instructions given to you by your care provider.

Understanding the legalities can help ensure this is a positive experience for both you and your doctor and will allow you to make recordings that are admissible in court if needed.

HIPAA Helper

Who is Revealing Your Private Medical Information?

Nathan Botts 0 4421 Article rating: No rating

This service from Pro Publica allows a person to search and find out whether your hospital, clinic, pharmacy or health insurer has been named in patient privacy complaints, breaches or violations. This tool includes data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (which enforces HIPAA), the California Department of Public Health (which enforces California’s medical privacy laws) and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (which tracks privacy violations at its vast network of veterans hospitals and clinics).

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